Sickle Cell Disease: Research

From its earliest days, the program has aggressively pursued development of new treatment approaches. In the 1980s, it led the way on the use of prophylactic penicillin in infants and continuous intravenous opioid analgesics in children. The 1990s brought pioneering studies of the outpatient management of fever in low-risk patients, and studies of intravenous corticosteroid agents on children with vaco-occlusive crisis and acute chest syndrome. 

Around the country, hematologists rely on data from the Dallas Newborn Cohort, a cohort of children with sickle cell disease cared for here since 1983. Providing comprehensive care for these children has allowed us to identify the medical problems that they face as they become young adults. 

Most recently, we collaborated with other leading pediatric sickle cell centers to study the use of hydroxyurea in infants. Nicknamed BABY HUG, the research published in Lancet in 2011 has emerged as groundbreaking research into this important and underutilized medicine to fight sickle cell disease. BABY HUG II, a follow-up study, is being led by Zora R. Rogers, M.D. 

Leading Researchers

Most recently, we collaborated with other leading pediatric sickle cell centers to study the use of hydroxyurea in infants. Nicknamed BABY HUG, the research published in Lancet in 2011 has emerged as groundbreaking research into this important and underutilized medicine to fight sickle cell disease. BABY HUG II, a follow-up study, is being led by Zora R. Rogers, M.D. and international sickle cell organizations. He has participated in more than 200 investigator-initiated and multicenter clinical trials and is currently engaged in more than 25 IRB-approved clinical studies involving hematology. 

The Gill Center’s Sickle Cell Disease Program is further strengthened by Dr. Zora R. Rogers, a UT Southwestern faculty member since 1990 and Clinical Director of Hematology for the Gill Center since 2011. She is well regarded as a national leader in sickle cell research, particularly for her leadership in the ongoing studies of hydroxyurea. Timothy McCavit, M.D., is building on the legacy of sickle cell research with a focus on the health outcomes and new treatments for vaso-occlusive crisis. 

Contact Cancer and Blood Disorders

214-456-2382

Contact Cancer and Blood Disorders at Legacy

469-303-4400

Contact the Cancer and Blood Disorders Referral Coordinator

214-456-2978